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Digital Badges: The future is here

Forward-thinking educators and innovative industry leaders agree that digital badges are evolving into a key credentialing and assessment tool for our times.

Bill Clinton picture
President Bill Clinton

“For a person to remain competitive in today’s workforce, there must be continual learning. But traditional assessment tools are narrow in scope and often aren’t able to communicate everything a person knows or has achieved. In order to capture the many and often informal ways that students and workers acquire knowledge and skills, and to enable institutions to recognize their accomplishments, we must embrace a more modern and comprehensive credentialing system.”

Arne Duncan picture
Arne Duncan

Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education
www.ed.gov

“Badges can help engage students in learning and broaden the avenues for learners of all ages to acquire and demonstrate—as well as document and display—their skills. By promoting badges and the open education infrastructure that supports them, the federal government can contribute to the climate of change that the education, business and foundation sectors are generating. We can build new avenues for entrepreneurship and collaboration and spark economic development at home and around the world.”

Connie Yowell picture
Connie Yowell

Director of Education, MacArthur Foundation
www.macfound.org

“Open Badges provides an alternative and more in-depth method for students and workers to demonstrate knowledge and skills. Meanwhile, badges also give employers a new way to assess critical but hard-to-measure skills such as creativity, communication, teamwork and adaptability.”

Nichole Pinkard picture
Nichole Pinkard

Associate Professor, DePaul University College of Computing and Digital Media
digitalyouthnetwork.org

“The anytime/anywhere access to digital badges and the evidence of learning that is connected to the badges offer a tremendous opportunity to tell the story of learning across all spaces of a learner’s life. Because each digital badge provides a window into the criteria for earning, the issuer and evidence of student work, it has the potential to simultaneously inspire and provide access to programs where peers can develop similar skills.”

Michael Robb
Michael Robb

Director of Education and Research, Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media
www.fredrogerscenter.com

“There is an incredible array of high-quality, research-based digital resources and materials available for early learning. Digital badging is a very promising way to incentivize and recognize early-learning teachers, family child-care providers, child-care center directors and administrators, librarians, and others’ knowledge and skills in digital media use and literacy, which are important for success in the 21st century.”

Rob Lippincott
Rob Lippincott

Former Senior Vice President for Education & Strategy, PBS

“I believe that badges can recognize and support early childhood educators’ knowledge and skills in digital media use and literacy, which are critical for achieving 21st century success and building a stronger education system and economy.”

Rob Lippincott
Joanna Normoyle

Experiential and Digital Media Learning Coordinator, The Agricultural Sustainability Institute at UC Davis
asi.ucdavis.edu

“Our students are bright, engaged, world-changing—and I know they’re getting a great education, but do they? And does anyone else? They need to gather the evidence, reflect on their experience and really see what they’ve accomplished—and where there’s room for growth—before sharing that story with others. Badges can help, giving students a framework to understand their own unique learning experience plus a simple, visually compelling format to curate and communicate that experience to the world.”